Foreword.

Cold outreaching. Cold emailing. Cold calling. Cold this. Cold that.

Are you intimidated? Don’t be.

Whether you’re new to cold emailing or you’re an experienced sales veteran, I wrote this guide to help you achieve more success in sales, with less stress.

And while I certainly don’t have all the answers, I do know a few things about the field of sales and outreaching which have allowed me to build several multi-million dollar businesses over the past five years.

Take my word for it: Cold emailing works!

My only hope is that this ebook is as helpful to you as it would be to me when I was just starting out.

Enjoy!

To your success,

Table Of Contents.

  • Chapter 1: The Most Common Outreaching Mistakes (And How To Avoid Them!) ……….… 4
  • Chapter 2: How NOT To Outreach ……………………………………………………………….……………….….… 8
  • Chapter 3: Phrases That Kill Trust …………………………………………………………………………………….… 11
  • Chapter 4: Subject Line Is King ……………………………………………………………………………….……….… 13
  • Chapter 5: The “Perfect Outreach” Formula  ……………………………………………………………………. 16
  • Chapter 6: Habits Ultra-Successful Salespeople Live By   ………………………………………….…… 17
  • Chapter 7: Follow-Up Templates (That Actually Work)  ……………………………………………….…… 19
  • Chapter 8: How To Use MailTag To 10X Your Sales Over The Next 30 Days ……..…..…… 22

Chapter 1:

The Most Common Outreaching Mistakes (And How To Avoid Them!).

Mistake #1): No Profile Picture. 

One of the most common mistakes salespeople make when sending outreaches actually has nothing to do with the outreach itself.

Before you send your next sales email, make sure that you have a clear and professional profile picture associated with your email address.

What your outreach looks like without a profile picture:

Putting a “face to the name” helps build trust, which is critical when you’re reaching out to strangers.

Mistake #2): No Email Signature.

Your email signature is a crucial part of your outreach.

Not only because it adds to your professionalism, but also because it increases your accessibility.

As a sales professional, your email signature should include your name, email, and contact number. It should look something like this:

People don’t have time for “essay outreaches”. Keep your outreach short. — @MailTagio

Mistake #3): Outreach Too Long.

As a general rule of thumb, you should keep your outreach as short as possible (between 4-8 sentences).

Reason being, the purpose of your outreach is not to divulge every detail about your proposal, your company, etc.

The simple purpose of your outreach should be to spark the interest of your recipient so you can set up a call. 

It should go without saying, but your prospect should never have to guess why you’re reaching out. When you disguise “the real reason” you’re emailing, you destroy all trust and credibility (more on this in the next chapter).

No one wants to feel as if they’re “just another name” in your spreadsheet. — @MailTagio

Mistake #4): Lack of personalization.

I’d highly recommend investing at least 90 to 180 seconds to customize each of your outreaches.

A couple of important points on personalization:

  • Always address your prospect on a first-name basis. If you don’t know the person’s first name, you probably shouldn’t reach out. Never start an outreach with “Hi there” or “Hi sir”.
  • Don’t send “fancy” emails. Keep it simple! Outreaches shouldn’t look like newsletters. They should simply be text emails — don’t include images (other than your email signature).
  • Don’t send your outreaches in bulk with “BCC” or newsletter services (e.g. MailChimp, SendGrid, etc.). Outreaches should never have an unsubscribe link.

Mistake #5): Writing about your needs (and not thinking from your recipient’s perspective).

If you only take away one thing from this eBook, let it be this:

Always think from the other person’s point of view.

Try to place yourself in your prospect’s shoes, and regularly ask yourself:

“What would I think if I received my email?”

Bonus Checklist:

Here’s a quick checklist of bonus questions for you to go through before you click “send” on your next outreach:

  • If I received this outreach, the subject line would spark my interest.
  • If I received this outreach, I would know that this email was personalized for me (and not “copied-and-pasted”).
  • If I received this outreach, I would respond.

Chapter 2:

How NOT To Outreach.

I recently received a message on LinkedIn from the Head of Sales at a Fortune 500 company (I’ll omit the company’s name for privacy reasons).

The outreach:

Needless to say, I was pretty excited when I got this message, as it’s pretty clear they’re considering MailTag’s software for their company (perhaps this could be a large order!).

… or, so I thought.

When I set up a call to speak with this rep, the conversation’s tone changed.

It became clear that I wasn’t the one who was going to be pitching MailTag.

Rather, he wanted to tell me that he had “heard of MailTag in a recent internal meeting” and wanted to personally invite me to the company’s exclusive upcoming conference.

The best part? *Drum roll please* …

… I could purchase a ticket to their conference for the one-time discounted price of $3,000 (not including airfare, hotels, and other expenses, of course).

Total bait-and-switch.

Needless to say, I passed.

This person had no interest in MailTag’s software. And it wouldn’t be surprising to see if he had sent the same LinkedIn message to hundreds of other people.

The funny thing is … had this sales rep told me the actual reason he was reaching out, I likely would have bought a ticket!

If I were to re-write the outreach, here’s how I’d fix it:

“Hi Alex,

My name’s John Smith from Widgets & Company.

I just saw your LinkedIn profile and checked you guys out. I am really impressed with the MailTag product, it’s a heck of a lot better than your competitors JoeShmoe1 and JoeShmoe2.

MailTag came up in a discussion recently. Widgets & Company is hosting an event (WidgetsCon2018) that lots of other software companies will be attending. I know there will be some execs attending that you’re going to want to connect with.

If you’re interested, I’d love to tell you more about it.

Let me know. 🙂

It’d probably require an investment of 180 seconds to research a few of our competitors and type a genuine compliment about our company.

Would this rep receive fewer replies because he revealed “the real reason” he was reaching out? 

Yes, probably. But, you know what? That’s not an issue at all!

Your personal reputation and the reputation of your company is infinitely more important than increasing your outreach response rate.

I’ll never trust this rep because he wasn’t straightforward with me from the beginning.

The moral of the story: Be honest with everyone you deal with.

There’s never an excuse to be shady about the real reason you’re actually reaching out.

Sell the way you would want to be sold to. No one appreciates a bait-and-switch tactic.

Chapter 3:

Phrases That Kill Trust.

 “To sell more, show certainty.” — @MailTagio 

When outreaching prospects, it’s best to avoid these phrases like the plague.

#1): “Honestly, …” or “In all honesty, …”

This phrase implies that you’ve been dishonest and subsequently destroys trust and rapport that you’ve established with your prospect.

Of course, it also leads the other person to ponder whether or not everything you said up until this point was completely honest.

#2): “As far as I know, …”

Imagine boarding an airplane and having your captain announce over the plane’s speakers:

“The plane is fueled and the cabin is pressurized … as far as I know.”

(I don’t know about you, but I’m getting the heck off that plane!)

The phrase “as far as I know”, creates uncertainty in the mind of your prospect.

And when your prospect feels that you’re uncertain about your product or service, good luck trying to close that sale.

For instance, you would (hopefully) never say to a prospect:

“The product has a 30-day refund policy, as far as I know.”

Instead, you would simply say: “The product has a 30-day refund policy.”

#3): “I’m pretty sure …”

When you are certain about what you are selling — when you know that your product or service can help the other person — you’ll feel energy and confidence in every fiber of your body.

You won’t be “pretty sure” — you’ll know. There’s a difference.

If you don’t know the answer to something, simply say you don’t know the answer.

The other person will respect your honesty.

#4): “To the best of my recollection …”

Like the others listed above, this phrase creates immediate distrust because it indicates that you’re uncertain.

And when you’re uncertain about what you’re selling, your prospect will be uncertain about buying.

#5): “To tell you the truth, …”

Just like the phrase “In all honesty, …”, you’re implying that everything you’ve said prior to this point hasn’t been completely truthful.

Use these phrases at your own peril.

Chapter 4:

Subject Line Is King.

“If you can’t get your prospect to open your email, nothing in your message will matter.” @MailTagio 

Here are a few subject lines I’d recommend experimenting with:

Subject Line #1): “A Quick Question.”

Yes, you read that correctly — just three simple words, followed by a period.

This subject line almost always sparks the recipient’s attention.

Why? Because almost everyone has time for a quick question!

For example, let’s imagine you’re selling SEO (search engine optimization) software.

Here’s how to incorporate your “quick question” into your outreach:

Subject Line: A Quick Question.

Hi Joe,

My name’s John Smith from Widgets & Company!

I just wanted to ask you a quick question regarding how your company is currently optimizing its SEO.

Are you currently using any optimization technologies?

In case you’re unfamiliar with our company, we’ve helped tens of thousands of businesses double their site traffic by optimizing for specific keyword searches.

I’d love to learn more about your organization’s goals and see if we can help you get there faster.

Would you be interested in opening a discussion later this week?

Kind Regards,

John Smith

Subject Line #2): “Friend of [friend of prospect]”

One super-effective strategy for increasing your outreach’s reply-rate is mentioning the name of a mutually known friend or contact in the subject line.

In my experience, I’ve found that using this strategy often doubles my response rate.

(After all, it’s pretty hard for a prospect not to respond to you if you both share a connection to a mutual friend!)

For example, try experimenting with these email subject lines:

Subject Line): Friend of [mutual friend]

Subject Line): Contacting you at [mutual friend]’s suggestion

Using our previous “SEO” sales outreach example, here’s how to incorporate your warm-lead connection into your outreach:

Subject Line: Friend of Jerry

Hi Joe,

My name’s John Smith from Widgets & Company!

A mutual friend, Jerry Joe, suggested I contact you regarding potential synergies of working together (Jerry’s a client of our company).

As Jerry may or may not have told you, our company has helped him double his website traffic in less than 22 days.

If you have a few minutes later next week, I’d love to learn more about the goals of [prospect’s company name].

Are you available to speak later this week?

Best,

John Smith

Try experimenting with these email subject lines and outreach templates today!

Chapter 5:

The “Perfect Outreach” Formula.

The formula is simple:

Personalization + Genuine Compliment + UVP (Unique Value Proposition) + A Clear Request = Success

Let’s take a look at the example outreach I created in chapter 2.

At 8 sentences, it’s on the longer side.

But nonetheless, let’s break it down into smaller pieces and analyze it.

“Hi Alex,

My name’s John Smith from Widgets & Company.

I just saw your LinkedIn profile and checked you guys out. I am really impressed with the MailTag product, it’s a heck of a lot better than your competitors JoeShmoe1 and JoeShmoe2. [Personalization + Genuine Compliment]

Widgets & Company is hosting an event (WidgetsCon2018) that lots of other software execs will be attending. I know there will be some execs attending that you’re going to want to connect with. [Unique Value Proposition]

If you’re interested, I’d love to tell you more about it. [Clear Request, aka “the ask”]

As always, place yourself in your prospect’s shoes and ask yourself if you would respond to your message.

Chapter 6:

Habits Ultra-Successful Salespeople Live By.

“One of the biggest mistakes that we make is that we convince ourselves that we don’t have to prospect on a regular basis.”

— Stephan Schiffman

#1). Prospect Daily.

To avoid having income “ups and downs”, have a consistent flow of new prospects.

This is only achieved by making prospecting a core part of your daily routine.

Always remember: Everything stems from outreaching.

It’s the foundation of your sales process.

No prospects = no cold calls.

No cold calls = no meetings.

No meetings = no sales!

#2). Become A Lifelong Learner.

To be successful in sales, you must become a lifelong learner.

You have to adopt the mindset that what you know today isn’t enough to get you to where you want to be tomorrow.

Read all that you can and become a sponge for absorbing new information.

It only takes one idea to transform your life forever.

(Sidenote: It’d be very remiss of me if I didn’t mention the books summary section of MailTag’s blog, where we summarize the best books on sales and persuasion).

#3). Take Notes.

Professional salespeople take notes when their prospects speak (both during sales calls and in-person meetings).

Taking notes not only shows that you are a professional, but also that you care about what the other person has to say.

#4). Focus on high-value work — and plan your goals intelligently.

Successful people (not just successful salespeople) view their time as money.

The goal achievement process is simple (not easy, but simple):

Step 1): Set an income target.

Know how much you want to make in the next year.

For example, $1,000,000 in the next 12 months.

Step 2): Divide your income target by the number of hours you’re going to work.

For example, 2,000 hours over the next 12 months.

Step 3): Identify the small handful of key activities in your business/profession that will create the greatest impact.

For example, if you’re a real estate agent, your two key activities would likely consist of meeting with prospects and making cold calls.

Step 4): Make sure you’re not doing any work that’s less valuable than your high-value key activities (this is the secret sauce to goal achievement!).

For example, during the 2,000 hours that you’re working, don’t spend a single moment not meeting with prospects or making cold calls.

Delegate everything that is not a key activity and exclusively execute on your $500 an hour high-value work.

Chapter 7:

Follow-Up Templates (That Actually Work).

“Be persistent or be forgotten.” — @MailTagio

80% of successful sales require an average of five follow-ups after initial contact.

Yet, 44% of salespeople never follow-up after their first outreach.

Here are a few follow-ups to experiment with:

………………………………………………………………………

Follow-Up #1:

I can only imagine that you’re super busy, so if you’d prefer to call me with any questions that you may have, my cell is 555–555–555.

Don’t hesitate to call at any time.

Looking forward to connecting again soon!

Sent from my iPhone

………………………………………………………………………

Follow-Up #2:

Just checking in. Wanted to make sure you got my email.

………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………

Follow-Up #3:

I’m writing to follow-up on my previous email.

If it makes sense to talk, please let me know how your calendar looks.

If not, may I ask you for the appropriate person for me to talk to?

Thanks for your help.

Best,

John

………………………………………………………………………

Follow-Up #4:

Just wanted to write you and check-in! 🙂

Do you have questions or need clarification on anything?

If so, please do not hesitate to give me a call at any time!

My cell: 555–555–5555

Best Regards,

— John

………………………………………………………………………

………………………………………………………………………

Follow-Up #5:

I’ve tried to reach you a few times but still haven’t heard back … which tells me one of three things:

#1). You’re not interested and I should stop bothering you.

#2). You’re interested but haven’t had the time to respond yet.

#3). You’ve fallen and can’t get up (and in that case, let me know and I’ll call someone to help you!) …

Please let me know which one as I’m starting to worry!

………………………………………………………………………

Follow-Up #6:

I wanted to reach out to you one last time.

If I don’t hear back from you, I’ll assume the timing isn’t right.

My information is below should you have any questions.

Cell: 555–555–5555

Office: 555–555–5555

………………………………………………………………………

Chapter 8:

How To Use MailTag To 10X Your Sales

Over The Next 30 Days.

Tip #1): Follow-up with your prospects quickly.

The fastest way to triple your outreach results is by following-up with your prospects within the first few minutes of your outreaches being read.

Using MailTag’s email tracker, you can receive real-time desktop alerts the moment your emails are opened.

Simply enable tracking for your email, and click send. It’s really that simple.

Watch the email tracking tutorial here ➞

Once your email has been sent, you can view its status by hovering your mouse over the MailTag icon (in your Sent Mail and Gmail threads).

Here, you can see information such as email re-opens, link clicks, and even the type of device used to read your email.

Tip #2): Schedule your emails to arrive at optimal times.

Studies show that the best time to send outreaches is in the morning between 5 – 6 AM.

Using MailTag’s email scheduling tool, you can write your outreaches at any time and schedule them to arrive later in the future (such as in the morning, so your email is at the top of your recipient’s inbox when they awake).

Once scheduled, your email will be stored as a draft and sent at your specified time.

Watch the email scheduling tutorial here ➞

Tip #3): Automate your follow-up process.

Let’s do some quick math.

If you send 50 outreaches a day, 5 days a week, you’re sending 250 weekly outreaches.

Assuming your response rate is 20%, that means 200 of your outreaches are going unanswered (every week).

If it takes you 90 seconds to follow-up with each of those 200 individuals who didn’t reply, that means you’re spending 5 hours, every week, following-up.

That’s 20 hours every month!

Using MailTag’s Pings feature, you can easily automate your email follow-up process so you don’t have to spend a single second following-up with anyone, ever again.

Here’s how it works.

Before you click send on your next outreach, attach a Ping sequence.

If your email doesn’t receive a reply, a quick follow-up will be sent every few days (from your email address), instantly bringing your messages to the top of their inbox.

And of course, you can also customize each of your follow-ups via your MailTag dashboard.

All of your follow-ups will be neatly organized in your original email thread

(this way, your recipient doesn’t have to go digging for your other emails).

And the best part? Once you receive a response back, any unsent Pings in your sequence are automatically canceled (this way, you don’t have to worry about follow-ups being sent after you’ve already received a reply).

Watch the email Pings tutorial here ➞

Chapter 9:

Getting Started With MailTag.

If you’re not already using MailTag, now is the time to start.

You can begin your completely free 14-day trial of MailTag using the button below.

There is no card required to begin your free trial and no risk to you.

Simply add MailTag to your Chrome browser, and you’re ready to go.

Start your completely free 14-day trial ➞

And, as a special gift for reading to the end of this eBook, you can save 40% on your MailTag subscription (for life), by simply using the code “EBOOK4” at checkout.

MailTag’s industry-leading (and unprecedented) guarantee:

Guarantee #1): 30-Day Money Back Guarantee.

Receive a full refund at any time within the first 30-days after your purchase for absolutely any reason.

Guarantee #2): 6-Month Performance Guarantee.

If you use our Chrome extension, and do not at least double your sales or productivity within the first 6 months of using MailTag, simply email Help@MailTag.io and you’ll receive a full refund within 24 hours.

Thank you again for taking the time to read this eBook! I hope it was helpful to you.
Have questions? Just want to say hello? Drop me a line! (Ben@mailtag.io)

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